Governor Brown Issues Proclamation Declaring "Admission Day"


9-9-2011

PROCLAMATION
BY THE GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA


Soon after the outbreak of war in 1846, United States forces landed in the Mexican province of Alta California. Seven months later, on January 13, 1847, representatives of both countries signed the Treaty of Cahuenga, ending the fighting in California and effectively ceding the province to the United States of America. For three years thereafter, California remained under martial law. During this period, our population exploded following the discovery of gold, a boom that urgently necessitated the establishment of a civil government. In 1849, leaders from around the future state met in Monterey to draft our original constitution, and in 1850 our Legislature began its first two-year session.

Even as our own lawmakers had begun establishing the institutions of state government that still exist today, the United States Congress could not agree on whether to admit us to the Union as a slave state or a free state or as two separate states, one slave and one free. The issue was resolved in the famous Compromise of 1850, and on September 9th of that year we were admitted to the Union as the 31st state. The annual celebration of this day is a long-standing tradition, and an occasion to reflect upon three great privileges we still enjoy: to be Californian, American, and free.

NOW THEREFORE I, EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor of the State of California, do hereby proclaim September 9th, 2011, as “Admission Day.”

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of California to be affixed this 9th day of September 2011.



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EDMUND G. BROWN JR.
Governor of California


ATTEST:



__________________________________
DEBRA BOWEN
Secretary of State